Real Doctors (Life Makers)
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
/October/ 23, 2017, 06:31:36 PM
6115 Posts in 1589 Topics by 6180 Members
Latest Member: kz7tfriex4b
Latest Forum Topics: Basic Gunshot Wound Care First Aid  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Ultimate USMLE Collection: Steps 1, 2 & 3 Videos, Books & Audiobooks  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  THE POST GRADUATE STUDY  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Surgical Examination Videos  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Pathoma for step 1  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Huge Collection of Dental Videos, Books & applications !  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Psychology Books Collection: 300+ Books  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:   Vaccines: are they really safe & effective? [Video Collection]  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  The Ultimate Massage Thread: Huge Collection of Videos & Books about Massage  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Manteca Chia - Full course of Taoist practice [1986-2007, DVDRip]  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  Natural Health - The Longevity Conference 2010 DVD Set  :-:-:-:-:-:-:-:  
Home Help Login Register

   * Clinical examination videos for Free

Doctors and medical students

Real Doctors (Life Makers)  |  Community complex  |  General Discussion  |  Ignoring useless information aids memory: study « previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Ignoring useless information aids memory: study  (Read 4032 times)
cleo_md
Administrator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 613



Ignoring useless information aids memory: study
« on: /November/ 23, 2005, 04:26:19 PM »

LONDON (Reuters) - Filtering out useless information can help people increase their capacity to remember what is really important, researchers said on Wednesday.

Scientists at the University of Oregon in the United States have demonstrated that awareness, or visual working memory, does not depend on extra storage space in the brain but on an ability to ignore what is irrelevant.

"Until now, it's been assumed that people with high capacity visual working memory had greater storage, but actually it's about the bouncer -- a neural mechanism that controls what information gets into awareness," said Edward Vogel who headed the research team.

The findings reported in the journal Nature would overturn the accepted concept of memory capacity, which has suggested that how much a person can remember depends on the amount of information crammed into the brain at one time.

Vogel and his team believe the results could lead to better ways to enhance memory and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive problems such as attention deficit disorder and schizophrenia.

Logged


 
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Google
 
Web www.real-doctors.com


| Tips club library